Exploring Insights of an Evaluation of a Meteorology & Oceanography Program for Training Navy Officers

Wayne Aaberg, Carla Thompson, Mark Shaffer

Abstract


The evaluation of training programs to determine effective strategies for improving performance is a priority in business and military environments.  Improved performance is a paramount interest for organizations dependent on training for preparing employees.  This evaluation study consisted of a one-group pre-posttest quantitative research design with N=45 participants completing a pre-assessment prior to entering the Basic Oceanography Accession Training course and a posttest assessment upon completion of the course. Study participants were comprised of Navy officers who had earned at least a baccalaureate degree prior to beginning the program and their major academic focus was one or more of the following areas: meteorology, marine science, oceanography, chemistry, biology, nuclear engineering, physics, geology, and geography.   Four research questions guided the study and include: (1) Is there a significant mean change in the positive direction from pretest to Basic Oceanography Accession Training test scores for each of the subscales identified on the Basic Oceanography Accession Training test instrument used in the study?; (2) Is there a significant mean difference between males and females on the various posttest subscales of the Basic Oceanography Accession Training test when pretest differences are controlled?; (3) Is there a difference in mean posttest subscale scores for the various academic majors of participants and  by gender?; and (4)  Is there a relationship between length of service (in years) and posttest scores of the participants? Implications for businesses and military environments grappling with evaluating employee training effectiveness are provided. Insights for future research efforts in routinely assessing training programs are highlighted.


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5296/ber.v3i1.3322

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