Online Instructional Materials for Students with Disabilities: Does it Work?

Jeanine L Wilson, Sally Berkowitz, Corina Bullock, Candace Cockrell, Lisa M Rodriguez, Anthony J Onwuegbuzie

Abstract


In the context of online instructional programs, numerous topics have been addressed. The purpose of this study was to explore the implementation of the Renzulli Learning System (RLS) in a large public school district in the southwest area of the United States as a measure of using online instructional materials toward increasing academic achievement for students with special needs. Specifically, the study explored the implementation of the RLS in support of students who have been identified as learning disabled. Moreover, the study comprised 2,750 students in Grades 6 through 8 and examined simultaneously high and low utilization of RLS with respect to state assessment reading and mathematics scaled scores through the use of a multivariate analysis of variance. Findings revealed that when the utilization of RLS was high by students with learning disabilities, the reading scaled scores (n = 1,212) tended to be higher, whereas the mathematics scaled scores (n = 1,269) tended to be lower. Implications of the findings are presented and recommendations for future research are provided.


Full Text:

PDF


DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5296/ije.v4i3.1866

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

To make sure that you can receive messages from us, please add the 'macrothink.org' domain to your e-mail 'safe list'. If you do not receive e-mail in your 'inbox', check your 'bulk mail' or 'junk mail' folders.

Copyright © Macrothink InstituteISSN 1948-5476